There once was a professor of a small community college in Buck Ten. He spent his evenings writing: each day he had a new story to tell. This man’s name was Archibold Whitichy Garderbon. No one knew of where this man had made origin, or of where this man claimed nationality. He was famous for writing, but why and how?

Archibold was an unu…sual doctor. The reason being: he only operated on sore knees. To compliment his odd practices, this professor was also a quite unusual author. He held the title to twenty-seven thousand Buck Ten bestsellers, but not one soul bought his work. Still, everyone seemed to own a personal copy of every title this man had ever finished.

Archibold Whitichy Garderbon spent every penny he made as a doctor and professor to buy his own books. I would like to say that this famous man simply gave them away to all of the people in his town, but that would simply be a lie. Doctor Garderbon had quite the problem. He spent his free time, with which he decided not to write, distributing his many books. He had a quite original distribution plan, one that I cannot say I agree with ethically.

He would walk down the street with an infinite amount of books in hand. He would throw them at everyone that he passed. He would walk into the locally owned shops and restaurants and target the innocents in bulk. As a result, everyone owned his many books. Don’t get me wrong. They always enjoyed the read. However the nice population of Buck Ten did not appreciate the price at which these books came.

Every six months, more than half of the population crowded the hallways of the local hospital. After a few years of this strange behavior, the people of Buck Ten stopped reading Archibold’s work.

The event that there-followed was known as the Buck Ten Riot. The entire population of Buck Ten met at the City Hall and carried and infinite number of books to the mansion of Doctor Garderbon.

Needless to say, The deranged doctor was not able to operate or teach any longer. The people of Buck Ten went about their lives and business and thought they would never heard from Archibold Whitichy Garderbon again.

Six months after the incident, one of the citizens found a title laying infront of City Hall that no-one had seen before…

The moral of the story is this. Never throw your book at random people. They may trample it under their feet, turn, and destroy you. We should not try and force anyone on our beliefs.

 

 

Join the group “Andrew Paul Short Story Club” on facebook to read weekly short stories.

 

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