In his knowledge, mankind has seemingly always yearned to reign supreme. He has wished to be lord over all and to be lacking in nothing. This can be seen especially as we observe man’s pursuits in philosophy. I’m not sure, though, that he realizes the implications of even the development of a philosophy.

 

1) In developing a philosophy, one admits that there is indeed a way to think about the external world.

 

2) If one admits that there is a way to think about the external world, then he admits also the existence of an external world.

 

3) If he admits the existence of an external world, then he admits the existence of a world not contingent on his own philosophy of that world or view of that world

 

4) If he admits that the existence of the world is not contingent on his own philosophy or view of that world, then he admits that the processes of that world are also not contingent on his philosophy or view of the world.

 

5) If he admits that the processes of the world are not contingent on his philosophy or view of the world, then he admits that his philosophy or view of the world does not have dominion over it.

 

6) If he admits that his philosophy or view of the world does not have dominion over it, he admits that the world operates independently of his philosophy or view of the world.

 

7) If one admits that the world operates independently of his philosophy or view of the world, then he admits also that philosophy or worldview is irrelevant as he interacts with the world.

 

8) If he admits that philosophy and worldview are irrelevant as  he interacts with the world, then he admits that philosophy and worldview are of no worth as he develops his philosophy.

 

9) If he admits that philosophy is of no worth, then he admits that he has wasted his time in the practice.

 

10) If he admits that he has wasted his time in the practice of philosophy, he admits also that considering ways to think about the external world is a waste of time.

 

11) If he admits the waste in considering ways to think about the external world, then he admits that there may not be an external world.

 

12) If he admits that there may not be an external world, then he admits that there may not exist a world apart from his own philosophy.

 

13) If he admits that there may not exist a world apart from his own philosophy, then he admits that there may not exist processes independent of his own philosophy.

 

14) If he admits that there may not exist processes apart from his own philosophy, then he admits that his philosophy may have dominion over the processes of the world.

 

15) If he admits that his philosophy may have dominion over the world, then he admits that the world may be dependant on his philosophy.

 

16) If he admits that the world may be dependant on his philosophy, the he admits the value of philosophy when interacting with the world.

 

17) If he admits the value of philosophy when interacting with the world, then he admits that philosophy may be relevant.

 

18) If he admits that philosophy may be relevant, he admits that it might be good to develop a philosophy.

 

19) In developing a philosophy, one admits that there is indeed a way to think about the external world.

 

 

It is always this sort of vicious cycle we find ourselves in when we try and master our own intelligence or our own knowledge concerning reality. The only way to break this cycle, is to rely on an external being, namely God, and to not rely so heavily our own philosophies regarding life. In short, without God’s intervention, no individual would be able to think coherently about the external world. Because of this, even the atheist, by developing what he calls a coherent philosophy, admits God’s existence as a rational being.

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